Aufwader is named after the small and mythical shore-dwelling creatures of the Whitby Witches Trilogy, and has been an avid reader of Mr Jarvis’ books for longer than is quite respectable. She has been published in Mslexia magazine and Women of the Wild, and is currently part of the team at MADA Books.

In addition to co-piloting the Great Grand (Re)Read, she also reviews the best, brightest, and most obscure in talking animal fiction over at Oh My Fur and Whiskers!, and is often to be found pestering Mr Jarvis and other unsuspecting writers on Twitter @aufwader or on Tumblr at Beyond the Silvering Sea.

 

Matt grew up in Sydney, Australia, the oldest of five in a homeschooling family. He stumbled across The Deptford Mice Trilogy when he was in his early teens, and it quickly became one of his favourite book series of all times. (His siblings all tell tales of how they were traumatised by hearing him read the Mice books out loud to them.) From then on, it became his habit to check out the J row in the young adult / children’s section of any bookstore that he was in, checking to see whether Robin Jarvis had written a new book.

Life took him down a path of studying mathematics and statistics at university, because he figured maths and business would be a lot more lucrative than anything like, say, an arts degree. Ironically, he switched careers to work in the classical music industry and has been there ever since.

Now 38, his interests include music, movies, books (especially the ones he loved as a kid!), theology, playing with his three kids, and exercising outdoors in the gloriously non-British mornings in Australia. In 2014, like Aufwader, he discovered that Robin Jarvis had a Twitter account and he feels like he has been interrupting Robin’s writing via that medium ever since …

You can read Matt’s musings on all sorts of stuff at his blog: including his former blogging projects: the One-Year War and Peace, the And Then There Were None Read-Along, and the Mahler Symphonies Guided Tour. For his thoughts on the future of classical music, check out futureclassical.com.

 

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